Berbers

  • berbers
    imaziɣen, ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ, ⵎⵣⵗⵏ
    berber flag.svg
    the berber ethnic flag
    total population
    +20–30 million[1][2][3] – +50 million[4]
    regions with significant populations
    moroccofrom ≈ 10 million[2] to ≈ 12 million[5][6][7]
    algeriafrom 9[2] to ≈ 13 million[7][8]
    libya~3,850,000[4]
    tunisia117,783[9]
    francemore than 2 million[10]
    mauritania2,883,000 (2,768,000[11] & 115,000[12])
    niger1,620,000[13]
    mali850,000[14]
    belgium500,000(including descendants)[15]
    netherlands367,455(including descendants)[citation needed]
    burkina faso50,000[16]
    egypt34,000[17] or 1,826,580[4]
    canada37,060 (including those of mixed ancestry)[18]
    israel3,500[19]
    united states1,328[20]
    languages
    berber languages (tamazight), traditionally written with tifinagh alphabet, also berber latin alphabet;
    maghrebi arabic dialects (among arabized berbers)
    religion
    predominantly sunni islam.
    minorities adhere to other islamic denominations (shia, ibadi), christianity (chiefly protestantism),[21][22] judaism, and traditional faith
    related ethnic groups
    other afro-asiatic peoples[23][24][25][26][27][28][29]

    berbers, or amazighs, (berber languages: ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ, ⵎⵣⵗⵏ, romanized: imaziɣen; singular: amaziɣ, ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖ ⵎⵣⵗ), are an ethnic group of several nations mostly indigenous to north africa and some northern parts of west africa.

    berbers mostly live in morocco, algeria, tunisia, libya, mauritania, northern mali, northern niger, and a small part of western egypt.

    berber nations are distributed over an area stretching from the atlantic ocean to the siwa oasis in egypt and from the mediterranean sea to the niger river in west africa. historically, berber nations spoke the berber language, which is a branch of the afroasiatic language family. the berbers of algeria were independent of outside control during the period of ottoman empire rule in north africa. they lived primarily in three different nations: the kingdom of ait abbas, kingdom of kuku, and the principality of aït jubar.[30] the kingdom of ait abbas is a berber nation of north africa, controlling lesser kabylie and its surroundings from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century. it is referred to in the spanish historiography as "reino de labes";[31][full citation needed] sometimes more commonly referred to by its ruling family, the mokrani, in berber at muqran, in arabic أولاد مقران (ouled moqrane). its capital was the kalâa of ait abbas, an impregnable citadel in the biban mountain range.

    flag of the berber nation the kingdom of ait abbas prior to modern-day algeria until 1872.

    there are about 32 million berbers in north africa who still speak the berber language,[3] most living in morocco, algeria, libya, tunisia, northern mali, and northern niger.[4] smaller berber-speaking populations are also found in mauritania, burkina faso and egypt's siwa town. the majority of north africa's population west of egypt is believed to be berber in ethnic origin, although due to arabization and islamization some ethnic berbers identify as arabized berbers.[32] there are large immigrant berber communities living in france, spain, canada, belgium, the netherlands, united kingdom, italy and other countries of europe.[33][34]

    dihya memorial in khenchela, algeria
  • name
  • prehistory
  • history
  • contemporary demographics
  • diaspora
  • languages
  • groups
  • religion
  • notable berbers
  • architecture
  • culture
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Berbers
Imaziɣen, ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ, ⵎⵣⵗⵏ
Berber flag.svg
The Berber ethnic flag
Total population
+20–30 million[1][2][3] – +50 million[4]
Regions with significant populations
Moroccofrom ≈ 10 million[2] to ≈ 12 million[5][6][7]
Algeriafrom 9[2] to ≈ 13 million[7][8]
Libya~3,850,000[4]
Tunisia117,783[9]
Francemore than 2 million[10]
Mauritania2,883,000 (2,768,000[11] & 115,000[12])
Niger1,620,000[13]
Mali850,000[14]
Belgium500,000(Including descendants)[15]
Netherlands367,455(Including descendants)[citation needed]
Burkina Faso50,000[16]
Egypt34,000[17] or 1,826,580[4]
Canada37,060 (Including those of mixed ancestry)[18]
Israel3,500[19]
United States1,328[20]
Languages
Berber languages (Tamazight), traditionally written with Tifinagh alphabet, also Berber Latin alphabet;
Maghrebi Arabic dialects (among Arabized Berbers)
Religion
Predominantly Sunni Islam.
Minorities adhere to other Islamic denominations (Shia, Ibadi), Christianity (chiefly Protestantism),[21][22] Judaism, and traditional faith
Related ethnic groups
other Afro-Asiatic peoples[23][24][25][26][27][28][29]

Berbers, or Amazighs, (Berber languages: ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ, ⵎⵣⵗⵏ, romanized: Imaziɣen; singular: Amaziɣ, ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖ ⵎⵣⵗ), are an ethnic group of several nations mostly indigenous to North Africa and some northern parts of West Africa.

Berbers mostly live in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Mauritania, northern Mali, northern Niger, and a small part of western Egypt.

Berber nations are distributed over an area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Siwa Oasis in Egypt and from the Mediterranean Sea to the Niger River in West Africa. Historically, Berber nations spoke the Berber language, which is a branch of the Afroasiatic language family. The Berbers of Algeria were independent of outside control during the period of Ottoman Empire rule in North Africa. They lived primarily in three different Nations: the Kingdom of Ait Abbas, Kingdom of Kuku, and the principality of Aït Jubar.[30] The Kingdom of Ait Abbas is a Berber nation of North Africa, controlling Lesser Kabylie and its surroundings from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century. It is referred to in the Spanish historiography as "reino de Labes";[31][full citation needed] sometimes more commonly referred to by its ruling family, the Mokrani, in Berber At Muqran, in Arabic أولاد مقران (Ouled Moqrane). Its capital was the Kalâa of Ait Abbas, an impregnable citadel in the Biban mountain range.

Flag of the Berber nation the Kingdom of Ait Abbas prior to modern-day Algeria until 1872.

There are about 32 million Berbers in North Africa who still speak the Berber language,[3] most living in Morocco, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, northern Mali, and northern Niger.[4] Smaller Berber-speaking populations are also found in Mauritania, Burkina Faso and Egypt's Siwa town. The majority of North Africa's population west of Egypt is believed to be Berber in ethnic origin, although due to Arabization and Islamization some ethnic Berbers identify as Arabized Berbers.[32] There are large immigrant Berber communities living in France, Spain, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Italy and other countries of Europe.[33][34]

Dihya memorial in Khenchela, Algeria