Biology

Biology deals with the study of life and organisms.

Biology is the natural science that studies life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical processes, molecular interactions, physiological mechanisms, development and evolution.[1] Despite the complexity of the science, there are certain unifying concepts that consolidate it into a single, coherent field. Biology recognizes the cell as the basic unit of life, genes as the basic unit of heredity, and evolution as the engine that propels the creation and extinction of species. Living organisms are open systems that survive by transforming energy and decreasing their local entropy[2] to maintain a stable and vital condition defined as homeostasis.[3]

Sub-disciplines of biology are defined by the research methods employed and the kind of system studied: theoretical biology uses mathematical methods to formulate quantitative models while experimental biology performs empirical experiments to test the validity of proposed theories and understand the mechanisms underlying life and how it appeared and evolved from non-living matter about 4 billion years ago through a gradual increase in the complexity of the system.[4][5][6] See branches of biology.

Etymology

Biology derives from the Ancient Greek words of βίος; romanized víos meaning "life" and -λογία; romanized logía (-logy) meaning "branch of study" or "to speak". Those combined make the Greek word βιολογία; romanized viología meaning biology. Although this, the term βιολογία as a whole didn't exist in Ancient Greek. First to borrow it were the English and French biologie. Since the advent of the scientific era, reanalyzable as a compound using the combining forms bio + logy.