Black people

  • black people is a skin group-based classification used for specific people with a mid to dark brown complexion. not all black people have dark skin; however, in certain countries, often in socially based systems of racial classification in the western world, the term black is used to describe persons who are perceived as dark-skinned compared to other populations. it is mostly used for the people of sub-saharan african descent and the indigenous peoples of oceania, southeast asia and the indian subcontinent.

    different societies apply different criteria regarding who is classified "black", and these social constructs have changed over time. in a number of countries, societal variables affect classification as much as skin color, and the social criteria for "blackness" vary. in the united kingdom, "black" was historically equivalent with "person of color", a general term for non-european peoples. in other regions such as australasia, settlers applied the term "black" or it was used by local populations with different histories and ancestral backgrounds.

    for many other individuals, communities and countries, "black" is also perceived as a derogatory, outdated, reductive or otherwise unrepresentative label, and as a result is neither used nor defined, especially in african cultures with little to no colonial history. some have pointed out that labeling people groups "black" is erroneous as the people described as "black" have a brown skin color.[1]

  • africa
  • asia
  • europe
  • oceania
  • north america
  • south america
  • see also
  • notes

Black people is a skin group-based classification used for specific people with a mid to dark brown complexion. Not all black people have dark skin; however, in certain countries, often in socially based systems of racial classification in the Western World, the term black is used to describe persons who are perceived as dark-skinned compared to other populations. It is mostly used for the people of Sub-Saharan African descent and the indigenous peoples of Oceania, Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent.

Different societies apply different criteria regarding who is classified "black", and these social constructs have changed over time. In a number of countries, societal variables affect classification as much as skin color, and the social criteria for "blackness" vary. In the United Kingdom, "black" was historically equivalent with "person of color", a general term for non-European peoples. In other regions such as Australasia, settlers applied the term "black" or it was used by local populations with different histories and ancestral backgrounds.

For many other individuals, communities and countries, "black" is also perceived as a derogatory, outdated, reductive or otherwise unrepresentative label, and as a result is neither used nor defined, especially in African cultures with little to no colonial history. Some have pointed out that labeling people groups "black" is erroneous as the people described as "black" have a brown skin color.[1]