Central Europe

  • different views of central europe
    central europe according to the world factbook (2009),[1] encyclopædia britannica, and brockhaus enzyklopädie (1998). there are numerous other definitions and viewpoints.
    central europe or mitteleuropa: usage recommendation by the standing committee on geographical names, germany.[2]

    central europe is the region comprising the central part of europe. central europe occupies continuous territories that are otherwise sometimes considered parts of western europe, southern europe, and eastern europe.[3][4][5] the concept of central europe is based on a common historical, social, and cultural identity.[a]

    central europe is going through a "strategic awakening",[16] with initiatives such as the central european initiative (cei), centrope, and the visegrád four group. while the region's economies shows considerable disparities of income,[17] all the central european countries are listed by the human development index as very highly developed.[18]

  • historical perspective
  • definitions
  • states
  • geography
  • demography
  • economy
  • education
  • culture and society
  • politics
  • central european time
  • in popular culture
  • see also
  • references
  • bibliography
  • further reading
  • external links

Different views of Central Europe
Central Europe according to The World Factbook (2009),[1] Encyclopædia Britannica, and Brockhaus Enzyklopädie (1998). There are numerous other definitions and viewpoints.
Central Europe or Mitteleuropa: usage recommendation by the Standing Committee on Geographical Names, Germany.[2]

Central Europe is the region comprising the central part of Europe. Central Europe occupies continuous territories that are otherwise sometimes considered parts of Western Europe, Southern Europe, and Eastern Europe.[3][4][5] The concept of Central Europe is based on a common historical, social, and cultural identity.[a]

Central Europe is going through a "strategic awakening",[16] with initiatives such as the Central European Initiative (CEI), Centrope, and the Visegrád Four Group. While the region's economies shows considerable disparities of income,[17] all the Central European countries are listed by the Human Development Index as very highly developed.[18]