Council of Chalcedon

  • council of chalcedon
    fourth ecumenical council of chalcedon - 1876.jpg
    fourth ecumenical council of chalcedon, 1876 painting by vasily surikov
    date451
    accepted by
    • catholic church
    • eastern orthodox church
    • anglican communion
    • lutheranism
    • old catholic church
    • most other protestants
    previous council
    council of ephesus
    next council
    second council of constantinople
    convoked byemperor marcian of the byzantine empire
    presidentanatolius, patriarch of constantinople; a board of government officials and senators, led by the patrician anatolius
    attendanceapprox. 520
    topicsthe judgements issued at the second council of ephesus in 449, the alleged offences of bishop dioscorus of alexandria, the definition of the godhead and manhood of christ, many disputes involving particular bishops and sees
    documents and statements
    chalcedonian creed, 28 canons
    chronological list of ecumenical councils
    chalcedon is located in istanbul
    chalcedon
    chalcedon
    chalcedon marked on a map of the istanbul region

    the council of chalcedon (n/, latin: concilium chalcedonense, greek: Σύνοδος της Χαλκηδόνας, synodos tēs chalkēdonas) was a church council held from 8 october to 1 november, 451, at chalcedon, a town of bithynia in asia minor. the council was called by emperor marcian to set aside the 449 second council of ephesus. its principal purpose was to assert the orthodox catholic doctrine against the heresy of monophysitism and eutyches, although ecclesiastical discipline and jurisdiction also occupied the council's attention.[1]

    the council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the catholic church, the eastern orthodox church, and most protestants. oriental orthodox churches do not agree with the conduct and the proceedings of the council, commonly calling it "chalcedon, the ominous". this disagreement led the oriental orthodox churches to separate from the rest of christianity after the council of chalcedon.

    followers of the council believe its most important achievement was to issue the chalcedonian definition, stating that jesus is "perfect both in deity and in humanness; this selfsame one is also actually god and actually man."[2] the council's judgments and definitions regarding the divine marked a significant turning point in the christological debates.[3]

  • background
  • convocation and session
  • acceptance
  • the status of the sees of constantinople and jerusalem
  • consequences: chalcedonian schism
  • oriental orthodox view
  • liturgical commemorations
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • bibliography
  • external links

Council of Chalcedon
Fourth ecumenical council of chalcedon - 1876.jpg
Fourth Ecumenical Council of Chalcedon, 1876 painting by Vasily Surikov
Date451
Accepted by
Previous council
Council of Ephesus
Next council
Second Council of Constantinople
Convoked byEmperor Marcian of the Byzantine Empire
PresidentAnatolius, Patriarch of Constantinople; A board of government officials and senators, led by the patrician Anatolius
AttendanceApprox. 520
Topicsthe judgements issued at the Second Council of Ephesus in 449, the alleged offences of Bishop Dioscorus of Alexandria, the definition of the Godhead and manhood of Christ, many disputes involving particular bishops and sees
Documents and statements
Chalcedonian Creed, 28 canons
Chronological list of ecumenical councils
Chalcedon is located in Istanbul
Chalcedon
Chalcedon
Chalcedon marked on a map of the Istanbul region

The Council of Chalcedon (n/, Latin: Concilium Chalcedonense, Greek: Σύνοδος της Χαλκηδόνας, Synodos tēs Chalkēdonas) was a church council held from 8 October to 1 November, 451, at Chalcedon, a town of Bithynia in Asia Minor. The Council was called by Emperor Marcian to set aside the 449 Second Council of Ephesus. Its principal purpose was to assert the orthodox catholic doctrine against the heresy of Monophysitism and Eutyches, although ecclesiastical discipline and jurisdiction also occupied the council's attention.[1]

The council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and most Protestants. Oriental Orthodox Churches do not agree with the conduct and the proceedings of the Council, commonly calling it "Chalcedon, the Ominous". This disagreement led the Oriental Orthodox Churches to separate from the rest of Christianity after the Council of Chalcedon.

Followers of the Council believe its most important achievement was to issue the Chalcedonian Definition, stating that Jesus is "perfect both in deity and in humanness; this selfsame one is also actually God and actually man."[2] The council's judgments and definitions regarding the divine marked a significant turning point in the Christological debates.[3]