Czechoslovakia

  • czechoslovakia

    Československo
    Česko‑slovensko[a]
    1918–1939
    1945–1992
    1939–1945: government-in-exile
    flag of czechoslovakia
    (1920–1992)
    lesser coat of arms (1920–1960) of czechoslovakia
    (1920–1960)
    motto: pravda vítězí / pravda víťazí’ (czech / slovak, 1918–1990)
    ’veritas vincit’ (latin, 1990–1992)
    ’truth prevails’
    anthems: kde domov můj (czech)
    ’where my home is’

    nad tatrou sa blýska (slovak)
    ’lightning over the tatras’
    czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the cold war
    czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the cold war
    capitalprague (praha)
    50°05′n 14°25′e / 50°05′n 14°25′e / 50.083; 14.417
    edvard beneš
    • 1938–1939
    emil hácha
    • 1948–1953
    klement gottwald
    • 1953–1957
    antonín zápotocký
    • 1957–1968
    antonín novotný
    • 1968–1975
    ludvík svoboda
    • 1976–1989
    gustáv husák
    • 1989–1992
    václav havel
    prime minister 
    • 1918–1919 (first)
    karel kramář
    • 1992 (last)
    jan stráský
    historical era20th century
    • proclamation
    28 october 1918
    • german occupation
    1939
    • re-establishment
    10 may 1945
    • coup d'état
    25 february 1948
    • velvet revolution
    november–december 1989
    • dissolution
    31 december 1992
    area
    1921140,446 km2 (54,227 sq mi)
    1992127,900 km2 (49,400 sq mi)
    population
    • 1921
    13,607,385
    • 1992
    15,600,000
    currencyczechoslovak koruna
    calling code+42
    internet tld.cs
    preceded by
    succeeded by
    austria-hungary
    kingdom of bohemia
    margraviate of moravia
    czech republic
    slovakia
    today part of czech republic
     slovakia
     ukraine
       zakarpattia oblast
    calling code +42 was withdrawn in the winter of 1997. the number range was divided between the czech republic (+420) and slovak republic (+421).
    current iso 3166-3 code is "cshh".

    czechoslovakia, or czecho-slovakia[1] (ɑː-/;[2][3] czech and slovak: Československo, Česko-slovensko[4][5]), was a sovereign state in central europe that existed from october 1918, when it declared its independence from the austro-hungarian empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the czech republic and slovakia on 1 january 1993.

    from 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into nazi germany, the state did not de facto exist but its government-in-exile continued to operate.

    from 1948 to 1990, czechoslovakia was part of the eastern bloc with a command economy. its economic status was formalized in membership of comecon from 1949 and its defense status in the warsaw pact of may 1955. a period of political liberalization in 1968, known as the prague spring, was forcibly ended when the soviet union, assisted by several other warsaw pact countries, invaded czechoslovakia. in 1989, as marxist–leninist governments and socialism were ending all over europe, czechoslovaks peacefully deposed their government in the velvet revolution; state price controls were removed after a period of preparation. in 1993, czechoslovakia split into the two sovereign states of the czech republic and slovakia.

  • characteristics
  • names
  • history
  • government and politics
  • population and ethnic groups
  • economy
  • resource base
  • transport and communications
  • society
  • education
  • religion
  • health, social welfare and housing
  • mass media
  • sports
  • culture
  • postage stamps
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • sources
  • further reading
  • external links

Czechoslovakia

Československo
Česko‑Slovensko[a]
1918–1939
1945–1992
1939–1945: Government-in-exile
Motto: Pravda vítězí / Pravda víťazí’ (Czech / Slovak, 1918–1990)
’Veritas vincit’ (Latin, 1990–1992)
’Truth prevails’
Anthems: Kde domov můj (Czech)
’Where my home is’

Nad Tatrou sa blýska (Slovak)
’Lightning Over the Tatras’
Czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the Cold War
Czechoslovakia during the interwar period and the Cold War
CapitalPrague (Praha)
50°05′N 14°25′E / 50°05′N 14°25′E / 50.083; 14.417
Edvard Beneš
• 1938–1939
Emil Hácha
• 1948–1953
Klement Gottwald
• 1953–1957
Antonín Zápotocký
• 1957–1968
Antonín Novotný
• 1968–1975
Ludvík Svoboda
• 1976–1989
Gustáv Husák
• 1989–1992
Václav Havel
Prime Minister 
• 1918–1919 (first)
Karel Kramář
• 1992 (last)
Jan Stráský
Historical era20th century
28 October 1918
1939
10 May 1945
25 February 1948
November–December 1989
31 December 1992
Area
1921140,446 km2 (54,227 sq mi)
1992127,900 km2 (49,400 sq mi)
Population
• 1921
13,607,385
• 1992
15,600,000
CurrencyCzechoslovak koruna
Calling code+42
Internet TLD.cs
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Austria-Hungary
Kingdom of Bohemia
Margraviate of Moravia
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Today part of Czech Republic
 Slovakia
 Ukraine
   Zakarpattia Oblast
Calling code +42 was withdrawn in the winter of 1997. The number range was divided between the Czech Republic (+420) and Slovak Republic (+421).
Current ISO 3166-3 code is "CSHH".

Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia[1] (ɑː-/;[2][3] Czech and Slovak: Československo, Česko-Slovensko[4][5]), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

From 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany, the state did not de facto exist but its government-in-exile continued to operate.

From 1948 to 1990, Czechoslovakia was part of the Eastern Bloc with a command economy. Its economic status was formalized in membership of Comecon from 1949 and its defense status in the Warsaw Pact of May 1955. A period of political liberalization in 1968, known as the Prague Spring, was forcibly ended when the Soviet Union, assisted by several other Warsaw Pact countries, invaded Czechoslovakia. In 1989, as Marxist–Leninist governments and socialism were ending all over Europe, Czechoslovaks peacefully deposed their government in the Velvet Revolution; state price controls were removed after a period of preparation. In 1993, Czechoslovakia split into the two sovereign states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.