Demonym

  • a demonym (m/; from greek δῆμος, dêmos, "people, tribe" and όνομα, ónoma, "name") or gentilic (from latin gentilis, "of a clan, or gens")[1] is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, usually derived from the name of the place or that of an ethnic group.[2] as a sub-field of anthroponymy, the study of demonyms is called demonymy or demonymics. examples of demonyms include cochabambino, for someone from the city of cochabamba; american for a person from the country called the united states of america; and swahili, for a person of the swahili coast.

    demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region. thus a thai may be any resident or citizen of thailand of any ethnic group, or more narrowly a member of the thai people. conversely, some groups of people may be associated with multiple demonyms. for example, a native of the united kingdom may be called a british person, a briton or, informally, a brit. in some languages, a demonym may be borrowed from another language as a nickname or descriptive adjective for a group of people: for example, "québécois(e)" is commonly used in english for a native of quebec (though "quebecker" is also available).

    in english, demonyms are always capitalized.[3] often, they are the same as the adjectival form of the place, e.g. egyptian, japanese, or greek, though significant exceptions exist; for instance, the adjectival form of spain is "spanish", but the demonym is "spaniard".

    english commonly uses national demonyms such as "ethiopian" or "guatemalan", but the usage of local demonyms such as "chicagoan", "okie", or "parisian", is rare. many local demonyms are rarely used and many places, especially smaller towns and cities, lack a commonly used and accepted demonym altogether. [4][5][6] often, in practice, the demonym for states, provinces or cities is simply the name of the place, treated as an adjective; for instance, kennewick man, saskatchewan open, and new york minute, but russian olive, the australian open, and chinese checkers.

  • etymology
  • list of adjectival and demonymic forms for countries and nations
  • list of adjectivals and demonyms for cities
  • suffixation
  • prefixation
  • non-standard examples
  • ethnic demonyms
  • fiction
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • sources
  • external links

A demonym (m/; from Greek δῆμος, dêmos, "people, tribe" and όνομα, ónoma, "name") or gentilic (from Latin gentilis, "of a clan, or gens")[1] is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, usually derived from the name of the place or that of an ethnic group.[2] As a sub-field of anthroponymy, the study of demonyms is called demonymy or demonymics. Examples of demonyms include Cochabambino, for someone from the city of Cochabamba; American for a person from the country called the United States of America; and Swahili, for a person of the Swahili coast.

Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region. Thus a Thai may be any resident or citizen of Thailand of any ethnic group, or more narrowly a member of the Thai people. Conversely, some groups of people may be associated with multiple demonyms. For example, a native of the United Kingdom may be called a British person, a Briton or, informally, a Brit. In some languages, a demonym may be borrowed from another language as a nickname or descriptive adjective for a group of people: for example, "Québécois(e)" is commonly used in English for a native of Quebec (though "Quebecker" is also available).

In English, demonyms are always capitalized.[3] Often, they are the same as the adjectival form of the place, e.g. Egyptian, Japanese, or Greek, though significant exceptions exist; for instance, the adjectival form of Spain is "Spanish", but the demonym is "Spaniard".

English commonly uses national demonyms such as "Ethiopian" or "Guatemalan", but the usage of local demonyms such as "Chicagoan", "Okie", or "Parisian", is rare. Many local demonyms are rarely used and many places, especially smaller towns and cities, lack a commonly used and accepted demonym altogether. [4][5][6] Often, in practice, the demonym for states, provinces or cities is simply the name of the place, treated as an adjective; for instance, Kennewick Man, Saskatchewan Open, and New York minute, but Russian olive, the Australian Open, and Chinese checkers.