Economic, social and cultural rights

  • economic, social and cultural rights are socio-economic human rights, such as the right to education, right to housing, right to an adequate standard of living, right to health, victims' rights and the right to science and culture. economic, social and cultural rights are recognised and protected in international and regional human rights instruments. member states have a legal obligation to respect, protect and fulfil economic, social and cultural rights and are expected to take "progressive action" towards their fulfilment.

    the universal declaration on human rights recognises a number of economic, social and cultural rights and the international covenant on economic, social and cultural rights (icescr) is the primary international legal source of economic, social and cultural rights. the convention on the rights of the child and the convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women recognises and protects many of the economic, social and cultural rights recognised in the icescr in relation to children and women. the convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination prohibits discrimination on the basis of racial or ethnic origin in relation to a number of economic, social and cultural rights. the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities also prohibits all discrimination on the basis of the disability including refusal of the reasonable accommodation relating to full enjoyment of economic, social and cultural rights.

  • international and regional human rights instruments
  • secondary legal sources
  • national constitutions
  • state responsibility
  • monitoring, enforcement and implementation framework
  • education is a human right
  • advocacy
  • theory of rights
  • see also
  • sources
  • references

Economic, social and cultural rights are socio-economic human rights, such as the right to education, right to housing, right to an adequate standard of living, right to health, victims' rights and the right to science and culture. Economic, social and cultural rights are recognised and protected in international and regional human rights instruments. Member states have a legal obligation to respect, protect and fulfil economic, social and cultural rights and are expected to take "progressive action" towards their fulfilment.

The Universal Declaration on Human Rights recognises a number of economic, social and cultural rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) is the primary international legal source of economic, social and cultural rights. The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women recognises and protects many of the economic, social and cultural rights recognised in the ICESCR in relation to children and women. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination prohibits discrimination on the basis of racial or ethnic origin in relation to a number of economic, social and cultural rights. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities also prohibits all discrimination on the basis of the disability including refusal of the reasonable accommodation relating to full enjoyment of economic, social and cultural rights.