Gondor

  • gondor
    j. r. r. tolkien's legendarium location
    blason gondor.svg
    coat of arms bearing the white tree,
    nimloth the fair
    location of gondor 3019 ta.svg
    gondor (red) within middle-earth, t.a. 3019
    first appearancethe lord of the rings
    information
    typesouthern númenórean realm in exile
    rulerkings of gondor; stewards of gondor
    other name(s)the south-kingdom
    locationnorthwest middle-earth
    capitalosgiliath, then minas tirith
    founderisildur and anárion

    gondor is a fictional kingdom in j. r. r. tolkien's writings, described as the greatest realm of men in the west of middle-earth at the end of the third age. the third volume of the lord of the rings, the return of the king, is largely concerned with the events in gondor during the war of the ring and with the restoration of the realm afterward. the history of the kingdom is outlined in the appendices of the book.

    according to the narrative, gondor was founded by the brothers isildur and anárion, exiles from the downfallen island kingdom of númenor. along with arnor in the north, gondor, the south-kingdom, served as a last stronghold of the men of the west. after an early period of growth, gondor gradually declined as the third age progressed, being continually weakened by internal strife and conflict with the allies of the dark lord sauron. the kingdom's ascendancy was restored only with sauron's final defeat and the crowning of aragorn.

    based upon early conceptions, the history and geography of gondor were developed in stages as tolkien extended his legendarium while writing of the lord of the rings. critics have noted the contrast between the cultured but lifeless stewards of gondor, and the simple but vigorous leaders of the kingdom of rohan, modelled on tolkien's favoured anglo-saxons. scholars have noted parallels between gondor and the normans, ancient rome, the vikings, the goths, the langobards, and the byzantine empire.

  • literature
  • concept and creation
  • influences
  • adaptations
  • notes
  • references
  • sources
  • further reading
  • external links

Gondor
J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium location
Blason Gondor.svg
Coat of arms bearing the white tree,
Nimloth the fair
Location of Gondor 3019 TA.svg
Gondor (red) within Middle-earth, T.A. 3019
First appearanceThe Lord of the Rings
Information
Typesouthern Númenórean realm in exile
RulerKings of Gondor; Stewards of Gondor
Other name(s)The South-kingdom
Locationnorthwest Middle-earth
CapitalOsgiliath, then Minas Tirith
FounderIsildur and Anárion

Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's writings, described as the greatest realm of Men in the west of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age. The third volume of The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, is largely concerned with the events in Gondor during the War of the Ring and with the restoration of the realm afterward. The history of the kingdom is outlined in the appendices of the book.

According to the narrative, Gondor was founded by the brothers Isildur and Anárion, exiles from the downfallen island kingdom of Númenor. Along with Arnor in the north, Gondor, the South-kingdom, served as a last stronghold of the Men of the West. After an early period of growth, Gondor gradually declined as the Third Age progressed, being continually weakened by internal strife and conflict with the allies of the Dark Lord Sauron. The kingdom's ascendancy was restored only with Sauron's final defeat and the crowning of Aragorn.

Based upon early conceptions, the history and geography of Gondor were developed in stages as Tolkien extended his legendarium while writing of The Lord of the Rings. Critics have noted the contrast between the cultured but lifeless Stewards of Gondor, and the simple but vigorous leaders of the Kingdom of Rohan, modelled on Tolkien's favoured Anglo-Saxons. Scholars have noted parallels between Gondor and the Normans, Ancient Rome, the Vikings, the Goths, the Langobards, and the Byzantine Empire.