Governance

  • governance comprises all of the processes of governing – whether undertaken by the government of a state, by a market or by a network – over a social system (family, tribe, formal or informal organization, a territory or across territories) and whether through the laws, norms, power or language of an organized society.[1] it relates to "the processes of interaction and decision-making among the actors involved in a collective problem that lead to the creation, reinforcement, or reproduction of social norms and institutions".[2] in lay terms, it could be described as the political processes that exist in and between formal institutions.

    a variety of entities (known generically as governing bodies) can govern. the most formal is a government, a body whose sole responsibility and authority is to make binding decisions in a given geopolitical system (such as a state) by establishing laws. other types of governing include an organization (such as a corporation recognized as a legal entity by a government), a socio-political group (chiefdom, tribe, gang, family, religious denomination, etc.), or another, informal group of people. in business and outsourcing relationships, governance frameworks are built[by whom?] into relational contracts that foster long-term collaboration and innovation.[citation needed]

    governance is the way rules, norms and actions are structured, sustained, regulated and held accountable.[citation needed] the degree of formality depends on the internal rules of a given organization and, externally, with its business partners. as such, governance may take many forms, driven by many different motivations and with many different results. for instance, a government may operate as a democracy where citizens vote on who should govern and the public good is the goal, while a non-profit organization or a corporation may be governed by a small board of directors and pursue more specific aims.

    in addition, a variety of external actors without decision-making power can influence the process of governing. these include lobbies, think tanks, political parties, non-government organizations, community and media.

  • origin of the word
  • types
  • as a normative concept
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Governance comprises all of the processes of governing – whether undertaken by the government of a state, by a market or by a network – over a social system (family, tribe, formal or informal organization, a territory or across territories) and whether through the laws, norms, power or language of an organized society.[1] It relates to "the processes of interaction and decision-making among the actors involved in a collective problem that lead to the creation, reinforcement, or reproduction of social norms and institutions".[2] In lay terms, it could be described as the political processes that exist in and between formal institutions.

A variety of entities (known generically as governing bodies) can govern. The most formal is a government, a body whose sole responsibility and authority is to make binding decisions in a given geopolitical system (such as a state) by establishing laws. Other types of governing include an organization (such as a corporation recognized as a legal entity by a government), a socio-political group (chiefdom, tribe, gang, family, religious denomination, etc.), or another, informal group of people. In business and outsourcing relationships, Governance Frameworks are built[by whom?] into relational contracts that foster long-term collaboration and innovation.[citation needed]

Governance is the way rules, norms and actions are structured, sustained, regulated and held accountable.[citation needed] The degree of formality depends on the internal rules of a given organization and, externally, with its business partners. As such, governance may take many forms, driven by many different motivations and with many different results. For instance, a government may operate as a democracy where citizens vote on who should govern and the public good is the goal, while a non-profit organization or a corporation may be governed by a small board of directors and pursue more specific aims.

In addition, a variety of external actors without decision-making power can influence the process of governing. These include lobbies, think tanks, political parties, non-government organizations, community and media.