Homo sapiens

  • homo sapiens
    temporal range: 0.35–0 ma
    preЄ
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    n
    middle pleistocenepresent
    akha man and woman in northern thailand – husband carries stem of banana-plant, which will be fed to their pigs
    male and female h. s. sapiens
    (akha in northern thailand,
    2007 photograph)
    conservation status

    least concern (iucn 3.1)[1]
    scientific classification edit
    kingdom: animalia
    phylum: chordata
    class: mammalia
    order: primates
    suborder: haplorhini
    infraorder: simiiformes
    family: hominidae
    subfamily: homininae
    tribe: hominini
    genus: homo
    species:
    h. sapiens
    binomial name
    homo sapiens
    linnaeus, 1758
    subspecies

    h. s. sapiens
    h. s. idaltu
    h. s. neanderthalensis(?)
    h. s. rhodesiensis(?)
    (others proposed)

    homo sapiens is the only extant human species. the name is latin for 'wise man' and was introduced in 1758 by carl linnaeus (who is himself the lectotype for the species).

    extinct species of the genus homo include homo erectus, extant from roughly 1.9 to 0.4 million years ago, and a number of other species (by some authors considered subspecies of either h. sapiens or h. erectus). the divergence of the lineage leading to h. sapiens out of ancestral h. erectus (or an intermediate species such as homo antecessor) is estimated to have occurred in africa roughly 500,000 years ago. the earliest fossil evidence of early homo sapiens appears in africa around 300,000 years ago, with the earliest genetic splits among modern people, according to some evidence, dating to around the same time.[2][3][note 1][6] sustained archaic admixture is known to have taken place both in africa and (following the recent out-of-africa expansion) in eurasia, between about 100,000 and 30,000 years ago.[7]

    the term anatomically modern humans[8] (amh) is used to distinguish h. sapiens having an anatomy consistent with the range of phenotypes seen in contemporary humans from varieties of extinct archaic humans. this is useful especially for times and regions where anatomically modern and archaic humans co-existed, for example, in paleolithic europe. omo-kibish i (omo i) from southern ethiopia is the oldest anatomically modern homo sapiens skeleton currently known (196 ± 5 ka).[9]

  • name and taxonomy
  • age and speciation process
  • dispersal and archaic admixture
  • anatomy
  • recent evolution
  • behavioral modernity
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Homo sapiens
Temporal range: 0.35–0 Ma
Middle PleistocenePresent
Akha man and woman in northern Thailand – husband carries stem of banana-plant, which will be fed to their pigs
Male and female H. s. sapiens
(Akha in northern Thailand,
2007 photograph)
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Infraorder: Simiiformes
Family: Hominidae
Subfamily: Homininae
Tribe: Hominini
Genus: Homo
Species:
H. sapiens
Binomial name
Homo sapiens
Subspecies

H. s. sapiens
H. s. idaltu
H. s. neanderthalensis(?)
H. s. rhodesiensis(?)
(others proposed)

Homo sapiens is the only extant human species. The name is Latin for 'wise man' and was introduced in 1758 by Carl Linnaeus (who is himself the lectotype for the species).

Extinct species of the genus Homo include Homo erectus, extant from roughly 1.9 to 0.4 million years ago, and a number of other species (by some authors considered subspecies of either H. sapiens or H. erectus). The divergence of the lineage leading to H. sapiens out of ancestral H. erectus (or an intermediate species such as Homo antecessor) is estimated to have occurred in Africa roughly 500,000 years ago. The earliest fossil evidence of early Homo sapiens appears in Africa around 300,000 years ago, with the earliest genetic splits among modern people, according to some evidence, dating to around the same time.[2][3][note 1][6] Sustained archaic admixture is known to have taken place both in Africa and (following the recent Out-Of-Africa expansion) in Eurasia, between about 100,000 and 30,000 years ago.[7]

The term anatomically modern humans[8] (AMH) is used to distinguish H. sapiens having an anatomy consistent with the range of phenotypes seen in contemporary humans from varieties of extinct archaic humans. This is useful especially for times and regions where anatomically modern and archaic humans co-existed, for example, in Paleolithic Europe. Omo-Kibish I (Omo I) from southern Ethiopia is the oldest anatomically modern Homo sapiens skeleton currently known (196 ± 5 ka).[9]