Ifriqiya

  • the roman province africa proconsularis (red) to which ifriqiya corresponded and from which it derived its name
    part of a series on the
    tunisia
    coat of arms of tunisia.svg
    africa (orthographic projection).svg africa portalp history.svg history portal
    part of a series on the
    algeria
    emblem of algeria.svg
    part of a series on the
    libya
    the emblem on the passport of libya.svg
    prehistory
    ancient history pre-146 bc
    roman era to 640 ad
    islamic rule 640–1510
    spanish rule 1510–1530
    order of saint john 1530–1551
    ottoman tripolitania 1551–1911
    italian colonization 1911–1934
    italian libya 1934–1943
    allied occupation 1943–1951
    kingdom of libya 1951–1969
    libya under muammar gaddafi 1969–2011
    first civil war 2011
    national transitional council 2011–2012
    general national congress 2012–2014
    house of representatives 2014–present
    second civil war 2014–present
    government of national accord 2016–present
    flag of libya.svg libya portal

    ifriqiya (arabic: إفريقيةifrīqya), known professionally as el-maghrib el-adna (arabic: المغرب الأدنى‎), was the area during medieval history comprising what is today tunisia, tripolitania (western libya) and the constantinois (eastern algeria) — all part of what was previously included in the africa province of the roman empire.[1]

    the southern boundary of ifriqiya was far more unchallenged as bounded by the semi-arid areas and the salt marshes called el-djerid. the northern and western boundaries fluctuated; at times as far north as sicily otherwise just along the coastline, and the western boundary usually went as far as béjaïa. the capital was briefly carthage, then qayrawan (kairouan), then mahdia, then tunis.[2] the arabs generally settled on the lower ground while the native population settled in the mountains.[citation needed]

    the aghlabids, from their base in kairouan, initiated the invasion of southern italy beginning in 827, and established the emirate of sicily and bari which lasted until it was conquered by the normans.

  • history
  • islam and africa
  • notable people
  • list of rulers
  • see also
  • notes
  • sources

The Roman province Africa Proconsularis (red) to which Ifriqiya corresponded and from which it derived its name
Part of a series on the
Tunisia
Coat of arms of Tunisia.svg
Africa (orthographic projection).svg Africa portalP history.svg History portal
Part of a series on the
Algeria
Emblem of Algeria.svg
Part of a series on the
Libya
The emblem on the passport of Libya.svg
Prehistory
Ancient history pre-146 BC
Roman era to 640 AD
Islamic rule 640–1510
Spanish rule 1510–1530
Order of Saint John 1530–1551
Ottoman Tripolitania 1551–1911
Italian colonization 1911–1934
Italian Libya 1934–1943
Allied occupation 1943–1951
Kingdom of Libya 1951–1969
Libya under Muammar Gaddafi 1969–2011
First Civil War 2011
National Transitional Council 2011–2012
General National Congress 2012–2014
House of Representatives 2014–present
Second Civil War 2014–present
Government of National Accord 2016–present
Flag of Libya.svg Libya portal

Ifriqiya (Arabic: إفريقيةIfrīqya), known professionally as el-Maghrib el-Adna (Arabic: المغرب الأدنى‎), was the area during medieval history comprising what is today Tunisia, Tripolitania (western Libya) and the Constantinois (eastern Algeria) — all part of what was previously included in the Africa Province of the Roman Empire.[1]

The southern boundary of Ifriqiya was far more unchallenged as bounded by the semi-arid areas and the salt marshes called el-Djerid. The northern and western boundaries fluctuated; at times as far north as Sicily otherwise just along the coastline, and the western boundary usually went as far as Béjaïa. The capital was briefly Carthage, then Qayrawan (Kairouan), then Mahdia, then Tunis.[2] The Arabs generally settled on the lower ground while the native population settled in the mountains.[citation needed]

The Aghlabids, from their base in Kairouan, initiated the invasion of Southern Italy beginning in 827, and established the Emirate of Sicily and Bari which lasted until it was conquered by the Normans.