Invasion of Java (1811)

  • invasion of java
    part of the napoleonic wars
    java locator.svg
    java, in southeast asia
    dateaugust - september 1811
    location
    java
    result british victory
    territorial
    changes
    java captured by britain
    belligerents

    united kingdom united kingdom

    • flag of the british east india company (1801).svg east india company
    france first french empire
    commanders and leaders
    robert stopford
    samuel auchmuty
    rollo gillespie
    jan willem janssens
    strength
    12,000 soldiers
    25 warships
    unknown
    casualties and losses
    1,000 2,000

    the invasion of java in 1811 was a successful british amphibious operation against the dutch east indian island of java that took place between august and september 1811 during the napoleonic wars. originally established as a colony of the dutch republic, java remained in dutch hands throughout the french revolutionary and napoleonic wars, during which time the french invaded the republic and established the batavian republic in 1795, and the kingdom of holland in 1806. the kingdom of holland was annexed to the first french empire in 1810, and java became a titular french colony, though it continued to be administered and defended primarily by dutch personnel.

    after the fall of french colonies in the west indies in 1809 and 1810, and a successful campaign against french possessions in mauritius in 1810 and 1811, attention turned to the dutch east indies. an expedition was dispatched from india in april 1811, while a small squadron of frigates was ordered to patrol off the island, raiding shipping and launching amphibious assaults against targets of opportunity. troops were landed on 4 august, and by 8 august the undefended city of batavia capitulated. the defenders withdrew to a previously prepared fortified position, fort cornelis, which the british besieged, capturing it early in the morning of 26 august. the remaining defenders, a mixture of dutch and french regulars and native militiamen, withdrew, pursued by the british. a series of amphibious and land assaults captured most of the remaining strongholds, and the city of salatiga surrendered on 16 september, followed by the official capitulation of the island to the british on 18 september. the island remained in british hands for the remainder of the napoleonic wars, and was restored to the dutch in the convention of london in 1814.

  • background
  • invasion
  • aftermath
  • british order of battle
  • citations
  • references
  • further reading

Invasion of Java
Part of the Napoleonic Wars
Java Locator.svg
Java, in Southeast Asia
DateAugust - September 1811
Location
Result British victory
Territorial
changes
Java captured by Britain
Belligerents

United Kingdom United Kingdom

France First French Empire
Commanders and leaders
Robert Stopford
Samuel Auchmuty
Rollo Gillespie
Jan Willem Janssens
Strength
12,000 soldiers
25 warships
Unknown
Casualties and losses
1,000 2,000

The invasion of Java in 1811 was a successful British amphibious operation against the Dutch East Indian island of Java that took place between August and September 1811 during the Napoleonic Wars. Originally established as a colony of the Dutch Republic, Java remained in Dutch hands throughout the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, during which time the French invaded the Republic and established the Batavian Republic in 1795, and the Kingdom of Holland in 1806. The Kingdom of Holland was annexed to the First French Empire in 1810, and Java became a titular French colony, though it continued to be administered and defended primarily by Dutch personnel.

After the fall of French colonies in the West Indies in 1809 and 1810, and a successful campaign against French possessions in Mauritius in 1810 and 1811, attention turned to the Dutch East Indies. An expedition was dispatched from India in April 1811, while a small squadron of frigates was ordered to patrol off the island, raiding shipping and launching amphibious assaults against targets of opportunity. Troops were landed on 4 August, and by 8 August the undefended city of Batavia capitulated. The defenders withdrew to a previously prepared fortified position, Fort Cornelis, which the British besieged, capturing it early in the morning of 26 August. The remaining defenders, a mixture of Dutch and French regulars and native militiamen, withdrew, pursued by the British. A series of amphibious and land assaults captured most of the remaining strongholds, and the city of Salatiga surrendered on 16 September, followed by the official capitulation of the island to the British on 18 September. The island remained in British hands for the remainder of the Napoleonic Wars, and was restored to the Dutch in the Convention of London in 1814.