Italian unification

  • italian unification
    risorgimento
    episodio delle cinque giornate (baldassare verazzi).jpg
    five days of milan, 18–22 march 1848
    date1848–1871
    locationitaly
    participantsitalian society, kingdom of sardinia, provisional government of milan, republic of san marco, kingdom of sicily, roman republic, carboneria, french empire, red shirts, hungarian legion, southern army, united provinces of central italy, kingdom of italy
    outcome
    • italian revolutions of 1820
    • italian revolutions of 1830
    • revolutions of 1848 in the italian states
    • first italian war of independence
    • second italian war of independence
    • expedition of the thousand
    • proclamation of the kingdom of italy
    • third italian war of independence
    • capture of rome
    • rome becomes the capital of the kingdom of italy
    part of a series on the
    italy
    old map of italian peninsula

    timeline

    flag of italy.svg italy portal

    italian unification (italian: unità d'italia [uniˈta ddiˈtaːlja]), also known as the risorgimento (/, italian: [risordʒiˈmento]; meaning "resurgence"), was the political and social movement that consolidated different states of the italian peninsula into the single state of the kingdom of italy in the 19th century. the process began with the revolutions of 1848, inspired by previous rebellions in the 1820s and 1830s that contested the outcome of the congress of vienna, and was completed when rome became the capital of the kingdom of italy.[1][2]

    the term, which also designates the cultural, political and social movement that promoted unification, recalls the romantic, nationalist and patriotic ideals of an italian renaissance through the conquest of a unified political identity that, by sinking its ancient roots during the roman period, "suffered an abrupt halt [or loss] of its political unity in 476 ad after the collapse of the western roman empire".[3] some of the terre irredente did not join the kingdom of italy until 1918 after italy defeated austria–hungary in world war i. for this reason, sometimes the period is extended to include the late 19th century and the first world war (1915–1918), until the 4 november 1918 armistice of villa giusti, which is considered the completion of unification. this view is followed, for example, at the central museum of risorgimento at the vittoriano.[4][5]

  • background
  • early revolutionary activity
  • revolutions of 1848–1849 and first italian war of independence
  • towards the kingdom of italy
  • third war of independence (1866)
  • rome
  • problems
  • historiography
  • risorgimento and irredentism
  • anniversary of risorgimento
  • culture and risorgimento
  • maps of italy before and during italian unification
  • references
  • bibliography
  • external links

Italian unification
Risorgimento
Episodio delle cinque giornate (Baldassare Verazzi).jpg
Five Days of Milan, 18–22 March 1848
Date1848–1871
LocationItaly
ParticipantsItalian society, Kingdom of Sardinia, Provisional Government of Milan, Republic of San Marco, Kingdom of Sicily, Roman Republic, Carboneria, French Empire, Red Shirts, Hungarian legion, Southern Army, United Provinces of Central Italy, Kingdom of Italy
Outcome
Part of a series on the
Italy
Old map of Italian peninsula

Timeline

Flag of Italy.svg Italy portal

Italian unification (Italian: Unità d'Italia [uniˈta ddiˈtaːlja]), also known as the Risorgimento (/, Italian: [risordʒiˈmento]; meaning "Resurgence"), was the political and social movement that consolidated different states of the Italian peninsula into the single state of the Kingdom of Italy in the 19th century. The process began with the revolutions of 1848, inspired by previous rebellions in the 1820s and 1830s that contested the outcome of the Congress of Vienna, and was completed when Rome became the capital of the Kingdom of Italy.[1][2]

The term, which also designates the cultural, political and social movement that promoted unification, recalls the romantic, nationalist and patriotic ideals of an Italian renaissance through the conquest of a unified political identity that, by sinking its ancient roots during the Roman period, "suffered an abrupt halt [or loss] of its political unity in 476 AD after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire".[3] Some of the terre irredente did not join the Kingdom of Italy until 1918 after Italy defeated Austria–Hungary in World War I. For this reason, sometimes the period is extended to include the late 19th century and the First World War (1915–1918), until the 4 November 1918 Armistice of Villa Giusti, which is considered the completion of unification. This view is followed, for example, at the Central Museum of Risorgimento at the Vittoriano.[4][5]