Leymah Gbowee

  • leymah gbowee
    leymah gbowee no fronteiras do pensamento porto alegre 2013 (9730602149).jpg
    gbowee in 2013
    born
    leymah roberta gbowee

    (1972-02-01) 1 february 1972 (age 48)
    central liberia
    nationalityliberian
    educationaa degree in social work, mother patern college of health sciences, monrovia, liberia; ma in conflict transformation, eastern mennonite university, harrisonburg, virginia, usa
    occupationpeace activist
    known forwomen of liberia mass action for peace and pray the devil back to hell
    awards2011 nobel peace prize

    leymah roberta gbowee (born 1 february 1972) is a liberian peace activist responsible for leading a women's nonviolent peace movement, women of liberia mass action for peace that helped bring an end to the second liberian civil war in 2003. her efforts to end the war, along with her collaborator ellen johnson sirleaf, helped usher in a period of peace and enabled a free election in 2005 that sirleaf won.[1] she, along with ellen johnson sirleaf and tawakkul karman, were awarded the 2011 nobel peace prize "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work."[2][3]

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Leymah Gbowee
Leymah Gbowee no Fronteiras do Pensamento Porto Alegre 2013 (9730602149).jpg
Gbowee in 2013
Born
Leymah Roberta Gbowee

(1972-02-01) 1 February 1972 (age 48)
Central Liberia
NationalityLiberian
EducationAA degree in social work, Mother Patern College of Health Sciences, Monrovia, Liberia; MA in conflict transformation, Eastern Mennonite University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA
OccupationPeace activist
Known forWomen of Liberia Mass Action for Peace and Pray the Devil Back to Hell
Awards2011 Nobel Peace Prize

Leymah Roberta Gbowee (born 1 February 1972) is a Liberian peace activist responsible for leading a women's nonviolent peace movement, Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace that helped bring an end to the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003. Her efforts to end the war, along with her collaborator Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, helped usher in a period of peace and enabled a free election in 2005 that Sirleaf won.[1] She, along with Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Tawakkul Karman, were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize "for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work."[2][3]