List of ethnic slurs

The following is a list of ethnic slurs (ethnophaulisms) that are, or have been, used as insinuations or allegations about members of a given ethnicity, or to refer to them in a derogatory (that is, critical or disrespectful), pejorative (disapproving or contemptuous), or otherwise insulting manner.

Some of the terms listed below (such as "Gringo", "Yank", etc.) are used by many people all over the world as part of their ordinary speech or thinking without any intention of causing offence.

For the purposes of this list, an ethnic slur is a term designed to insult others on the basis of race, ethnicity, or nationality. Each term is listed followed by its country or region of usage, a definition, and a reference to that term.

Ethnic slurs may also be produced as a racial epithet by combining a general-purpose insult with the name of ethnicity, such as "dirty Jew", "Russian pig", etc. Other common insulting modifiers include "dog", "filthy", etc. Such terms are not included in this list.

A

Abbie, Abe, Abie
(North America) a Jewish man. From the proper name Abraham. Originated before the 1950s.[1]
ABC
(East Asia) American-born Chinese, Han or other Chinese (including Taiwanese) born and raised in the United States. The term implies an otherness or lack of connection to their Chinese identity and (usually) Chinese language; however, it has been reappropriated by many Chinese Americans and used to convey positive connotations.[2]
ABCD
(South Asians in the US) American-Born Confused Desi, Indian Americans or other South Asian Americans, (desi) who were born in the United States. Used chiefly by South Asian immigrants to imply confusion about cultural identity.[3]
Abid/Abeed (plural)
(Middle East and North Africa) an Arabic term for slave, often used as a racial slur against black Africans and is associated with the Arab slave trade.[4][5]
Abo/Abbo
(AUS) Australian Aboriginal person. Originally, this was simply an informal term for Aborigine, and was in fact used by Aboriginal people themselves (such as in the Aboriginal-run newspaper Abo Call) until it started to be considered offensive in the 1950s. In more remote areas, Aboriginal people still often refer to themselves (quite neutrally) as Blackfellas (and whites as Whitefellas). Although Abo is still considered quite offensive by many, the pejorative boong is now more commonly used when the intent is deliberately to offend, as that word's status as an insult is unequivocal.[6]
Afro engineering, African engineering or nigger rigging
(U.S.) Shoddy, second-rate[7] or unconventional, makeshift workmanship.[8]
Ali Baba
(U.S.) an Iraqi suspected of criminal activity.[9]
Alligator bait / Gator bait
(U.S.) a black person, especially a black child. More commonly used in states where alligators are found, particularly Florida. First used in the early 20th century, although some hypothesize the term originated in the late 19th century.[10] The term derives from the fact that, during the slave trade, Black children and babies were supposedly used as bait by White people in the US in order to catch alligators.[11]
Ann
(North America) a white woman to a black person—or a black woman who acts "like a white woman". While Miss Ann, also just plain Ann, is a derisive reference to white women, it is also applied to any black woman who is deemed to be acting as though she is white.[12][13]
Annamite
Annamite or mites, a derogatory name for Vietnamese people. (French, English)[14][15][16]
Ape
A black person, referring to outdated theories ascribing cultural differences between ethnic groups as being linked to their evolutionary distance from chimpanzees, with which humans share common ancestry.[17][18]
Apple
(North America) an American Indian (Native American) who is "red on the outside, white on the inside". Used primarily by other American Indians to indicate someone who has lost touch with their cultural identity. First used in the 1970s.[19]
Arabush (ערבוש)
(Israel) Arabs, derived from Hebrew "Aravi" (Arab) which is itself inoffensive.[20]
Armo
(U.S.) an Armenian/Armenian American.[21] Especially used in Southern California.[22]
Aseng
(Indonesia) insult to non-Indonesian citizen, from "[orang] asing" (foreigner) that rhymed with "Aseng" (Chinese name). This word is often pointed to Chinese due to Indonesia's relation with PRC.[23]
Aunt Jemima / Aunt Jane / Aunt Mary / Aunt Sally
(U.S.) a black woman who "kisses up" to whites, a "sellout", female counterpart of Uncle Tom.[24]
Ayrab/A-rab
(U.S.) an Arab. Occasionally used for Sephardic Jews primarily by Ashkenazi Jews.[25] Popularised in Ray Stevens' 1962 song "Ahab the Arab".[26]