Postcolonial feminism

  • postcolonial feminism is a form of feminism that developed as a response to feminism focusing solely on the experiences of women in western cultures. postcolonial feminism seeks to account for the way that racism and the long-lasting political, economic, and cultural effects of colonialism affect non-white, non-western women in the postcolonial world.[1] postcolonial feminism originated in the 1980s as a critique of feminist theorists in developed countries pointing out the universalizing tendencies of mainstream feminist ideas and argues that women living in non-western countries are misrepresented.[2]

    postcolonial feminism argues that by using the term "woman" as a universal group, women are then only defined by their gender and not by social class, race, ethnicity, or sexual preference.[3] postcolonial feminists also work to incorporate the ideas of indigenous and other third world feminist movements into mainstream western feminism. third world feminism stems from the idea that feminism in third world countries is not imported from the first world, but originates from internal ideologies and socio-cultural factors.[4]

    postcolonial feminism is sometimes criticized by mainstream feminism, which argues that postcolonial feminism weakens the wider feminist movement by dividing it.[5] it is also often criticized for its western bias which will be discussed further below.[6]

  • history
  • theory
  • relationship to western feminisms
  • relationship to postcolonial theory
  • race and religion
  • colonial and postcolonial race influence
  • relationship to third world feminism
  • double colonization
  • critiques
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Postcolonial feminism is a form of feminism that developed as a response to feminism focusing solely on the experiences of women in Western cultures. Postcolonial feminism seeks to account for the way that racism and the long-lasting political, economic, and cultural effects of colonialism affect non-white, non-Western women in the postcolonial world.[1] Postcolonial feminism originated in the 1980s as a critique of feminist theorists in developed countries pointing out the universalizing tendencies of mainstream feminist ideas and argues that women living in non-Western countries are misrepresented.[2]

Postcolonial feminism argues that by using the term "woman" as a universal group, women are then only defined by their gender and not by social class, race, ethnicity, or sexual preference.[3] Postcolonial feminists also work to incorporate the ideas of indigenous and other Third World feminist movements into mainstream Western feminism. Third World feminism stems from the idea that feminism in Third World countries is not imported from the First World, but originates from internal ideologies and socio-cultural factors.[4]

Postcolonial feminism is sometimes criticized by mainstream feminism, which argues that postcolonial feminism weakens the wider feminist movement by dividing it.[5] It is also often criticized for its Western bias which will be discussed further below.[6]