Protest

  • demonstration against the president of iran mahmoud ahmadinejad during the rio+20 conference in brazil, june 2012
    farmer land rights protest in jakarta, indonesia
    a working class political protest in greece calling for the boycott of a bookshop after an employee was fired, allegedly for her political activism
    anti-nuclear power plant rally on 19 september 2011 at meiji shrine complex in tokyo. sixty thousand people marched chanting "sayonara nuclear power" and waving banners, to call on japan's government to abandon nuclear power, following the fukushima nuclear disaster.[1]
    demonstration in front of the headquarters of the spanish national police in barcelona during 2017 catalan general strike against brutal polices during referendum

    a protest (also called a remonstrance, remonstration or demonstration) is an expression of bearing witness on behalf of an express cause by words or actions with regard to particular events, policies or situations. protests can take many different forms, from individual statements to mass demonstrations. protesters may organize a protest as a way of publicly making their opinions heard in an attempt to influence public opinion or government policy, or they may undertake direct action in an attempt to directly enact desired changes themselves.[2] where protests are part of a systematic and peaceful nonviolent campaign to achieve a particular objective, and involve the use of pressure as well as persuasion, they go beyond mere protest and may be better described as cases of civil resistance or nonviolent resistance.[3]

    various forms of self-expression and protest are sometimes restricted by governmental policy (such as the requirement of protest permits),[4] economic circumstances, religious orthodoxy, social structures, or media monopoly. one state reaction to protests is the use of riot police. observers have noted an increased militarization of protest policing, with police deploying armored vehicles and snipers against the protesters. when such restrictions occur, protests may assume the form of open civil disobedience, more subtle forms of resistance against the restrictions, or may spill over into other areas such as culture and emigration.

    a protest itself may at times be the subject of a counter-protest. in such a case, counter-protesters demonstrate their support for the person, policy, action, etc. that is the subject of the original protest. in some cases, these protesters can violently clash.

  • historical notions
  • forms of protest
  • typology
  • economic effects against companies
  • see also
  • references

Demonstration against the President of Iran Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during the Rio+20 conference in Brazil, June 2012
Farmer land rights protest in Jakarta, Indonesia
A working class political protest in Greece calling for the boycott of a bookshop after an employee was fired, allegedly for her political activism
Anti-nuclear Power Plant Rally on 19 September 2011 at Meiji Shrine complex in Tokyo. Sixty thousand people marched chanting "Sayonara nuclear power" and waving banners, to call on Japan's government to abandon nuclear power, following the Fukushima nuclear disaster.[1]
Demonstration in front of the headquarters of the Spanish National Police in Barcelona during 2017 Catalan general strike against brutal polices during referendum

A protest (also called a remonstrance, remonstration or demonstration) is an expression of bearing witness on behalf of an express cause by words or actions with regard to particular events, policies or situations. Protests can take many different forms, from individual statements to mass demonstrations. Protesters may organize a protest as a way of publicly making their opinions heard in an attempt to influence public opinion or government policy, or they may undertake direct action in an attempt to directly enact desired changes themselves.[2] Where protests are part of a systematic and peaceful nonviolent campaign to achieve a particular objective, and involve the use of pressure as well as persuasion, they go beyond mere protest and may be better described as cases of civil resistance or nonviolent resistance.[3]

Various forms of self-expression and protest are sometimes restricted by governmental policy (such as the requirement of protest permits),[4] economic circumstances, religious orthodoxy, social structures, or media monopoly. One state reaction to protests is the use of riot police. Observers have noted an increased militarization of protest policing, with police deploying armored vehicles and snipers against the protesters. When such restrictions occur, protests may assume the form of open civil disobedience, more subtle forms of resistance against the restrictions, or may spill over into other areas such as culture and emigration.

A protest itself may at times be the subject of a counter-protest. In such a case, counter-protesters demonstrate their support for the person, policy, action, etc. that is the subject of the original protest. In some cases, these protesters can violently clash.