Rishabhanatha

  • rishabhanatha
    first tirthankara
    rishabhanatha
    image of rishabhanatha at kundalpur pilgrimage site in madhya pradesh, india
    other namesadinatha, adish jina (first conqueror), adarsh purush (first perfect man), ikshvaku
    successorajitanatha
    symbolbull
    height500 arc-lengths (800 ells, 1200 feet)[1]
    age8,400,000 purva years[1][2][3]
    treebanyan
    colorgolden
    personal information
    born
    ayodhya
    died
    mount asthapada
    parents
    • nabhi (father)
    • marudevi (mother)
    spousesunanda & sumangala
    children100 sons including bharata chakravartin and bahubali, and 2 daughters: sundari, brahmi[4]

    rishabhanatha (also Ṛṣabhadeva, rishabhadeva, or Ṛṣabha) is the first tirthankara (ford maker) of jainism.[5][6] he was the first of twenty-four teachers in the present half-cycle of time in jain cosmology, and called a "ford maker" because his teachings helped one across the sea of interminable rebirths and deaths (saṃsāra). jain legends depict him as having lived millions of years ago.[7][4] he is also known as Ādinātha which translates into "first (adi) lord (nātha)",[7] as well as adishvara (first ishvara), yugadideva (deva of yuga), prathamaraja (first king), and nabheya (son of nabhi).[8][9] along with mahavira, parshvanatha and neminatha, rishabhanatha is one of the four tirthankaras that attract the most devotional worship among the jains.[10]

    according to jain traditional accounts, he was born to king nabhi and queen marudevi in the north indian city of ayodhya, also called vinita.[4] he had two wives, sunanda and sumangala. sumangala is described as the mother of his ninety-nine sons (including bharata) and one daughter, brahmi. sunanda is depicted as the mother of bahubali and sundari. the sudden death of nilanjana, one of the dancers of indra, reminded him of the world's transitory nature, and he developed a desire for renunciation.

    after his renunciation, the jain legends state rishabhanatha wandered without food for an entire year. the day on which he got his first ahara (food) is celebrated by jains as akshaya tritiya. he attained moksha on mount asthapada (kailash). the text adi purana by jinasena is an account of the events of his life. his iconography includes colossal statues such as statue of ahimsa, bawangaja and those erected in gopachal hill. his icons include the eponymous bull as his emblem, the nyagrodha tree, gomukha (bull-faced) yaksha, and chakreshvari yakshi.

  • introduction
  • historicity
  • jain traditional biography
  • in literature
  • iconography
  • temples
  • see also
  • notes
  • references

Rishabhanatha
Rishabhanatha
Image of Rishabhanatha at Kundalpur pilgrimage site in Madhya Pradesh, India
Other namesAdinatha, Adish Jina (first conqueror), Adarsh Purush (first Perfect Man), Ikshvaku
SuccessorAjitanatha
SymbolBull
Height500 arc-lengths (800 ells, 1200 feet)[1]
Age8,400,000 purva years[1][2][3]
TreeBanyan
ColorGolden
Personal information
Born
Died
Parents
SpouseSunanda & Sumangala
Children100 sons including Bharata Chakravartin and Bahubali, and 2 daughters: Sundari, Brahmi[4]

Rishabhanatha (also Ṛṣabhadeva, Rishabhadeva, or Ṛṣabha) is the first Tirthankara (ford maker) of Jainism.[5][6] He was the first of twenty-four teachers in the present half-cycle of time in Jain cosmology, and called a "ford maker" because his teachings helped one across the sea of interminable rebirths and deaths (saṃsāra). Jain legends depict him as having lived millions of years ago.[7][4] He is also known as Ādinātha which translates into "First (Adi) Lord (nātha)",[7] as well as Adishvara (first ishvara), Yugadideva (deva of yuga), Prathamaraja (first king), and Nabheya (son of Nabhi).[8][9] Along with Mahavira, Parshvanatha and Neminatha, Rishabhanatha is one of the four Tirthankaras that attract the most devotional worship among the Jains.[10]

According to Jain traditional accounts, he was born to king Nabhi and queen Marudevi in the north Indian city of Ayodhya, also called Vinita.[4] He had two wives, Sunanda and Sumangala. Sumangala is described as the mother of his ninety-nine sons (including Bharata) and one daughter, Brahmi. Sunanda is depicted as the mother of Bahubali and Sundari. The sudden death of Nilanjana, one of the dancers of Indra, reminded him of the world's transitory nature, and he developed a desire for renunciation.

After his renunciation, the Jain legends state Rishabhanatha wandered without food for an entire year. The day on which he got his first ahara (food) is celebrated by Jains as Akshaya Tritiya. He attained Moksha on Mount Asthapada (Kailash). The text Adi Purana by Jinasena is an account of the events of his life. His iconography includes colossal statues such as Statue of Ahimsa, Bawangaja and those erected in Gopachal hill. His icons include the eponymous bull as his emblem, the Nyagrodha tree, Gomukha (bull-faced) Yaksha, and Chakreshvari Yakshi.