Sinophobia

Results of 2019 Pew Research Center poll.
Views of China by country[1]
Sorted by Pos-Neg
Country polledPositiveNegativeNeutralPos-Neg
 Japan
14%
85%
2-71
 Sweden
25%
70%
6-45
 Canada
27%
67%
5-40
 United States
26%
60%
13-34
 Czech Republic
27%
57%
16-30
 France
33%
62%
5-29
 South Korea
34%
63%
2-29
 Germany
34%
56%
11-22
 Netherlands
36%
58%
6-22
 Australia
36%
57%
7-21
 Italy
37%
57%
7-20
 United Kingdom
38%
55%
7-17
 Spain
39%
53%
8-14
 Philippines
42%
54%
4-12
 Slovakia
40%
48%
12-8
 Indonesia
36%
36%
270
 Hungary
40%
37%
24+3
 South Africa
46%
35%
19+11
 Lithuania
45%
33%
21+12
 Poland
47%
34%
19+13
 Greece
51%
32%
17+19
 Argentina
47%
24%
29+23
 Brazil
51%
27%
22+24
 Mexico
50%
22%
28+28
 Kenya
58%
25%
16+33
 Bulgaria
55%
20%
25+35
 Israel
66%
25%
9+41
 Ukraine
57%
14%
28+43
 Lebanon
68%
22%
10+46
 Tunisia
63%
16%
21+47
 Nigeria
70%
17%
13+53
 Russia
71%
18%
11+53
Results of 2017 BBC World Service poll.
Views of China's influence by country[2]
Sorted by Pos-Neg
Country polledPositiveNegativePos-Neg
 Spain
15%
68%
-53
 United States
22%
70%
-48
 India
19%
60%
-41
 Turkey
29%
54%
-25
 France
35%
60%
-25
 Indonesia
28%
50%
-22
 United Kingdom
37%
58%
-21
 Germany
20%
35%
-15
 Canada
37%
51%
-14
 Australia
46%
47%
-1
World (excl. China)
41%
42%
-1
 Brazil
45%
38%
7
 Greece
37%
25%
12
 Peru
49%
34%
15
 Russia
44%
23%
21
 Mexico
55%
26%
29
 Kenya
63%
27%
36
 Pakistan
63%
12%
51
 Nigeria
83%
9%
74
 China
88%
10%
78

Anti-Chinese sentiment or Sinophobia (from Late Latin Sinae "China" and Greek φόβος, phobos, "fear") is a sentiment against China, its people, overseas Chinese, or Chinese culture.[3] It often targets Chinese minorities living outside of China and involves immigration, development of national identity in neighbouring countries, disparity of wealth, the past central tributary system, majority-minority relations, imperialist legacies, and racism.[4][5][6] Its opposite is Sinophilia.

Statistics and background

In 2013, Pew Research Center from the United States conducted a survey over Sinophobia, finding that China was viewed favorably in just half (19 of 38) of the nations surveyed, excluding China itself. Beijing's strongest supporters are in Asia, in Malaysia (81%) and Pakistan (81%); African nations of Kenya (78%), Senegal (77%) and Nigeria (76%); as well as Latin America, particularly in countries dependent on the Chinese market, such as Venezuela (71%), Brazil (65%) and Chile (62%).[7] Anti-Chinese sentiment remains permanent, however, in the West and other Asian countries: only 28% of Germans and Italians and 37% of Americans view China favorably. It is in Japan where, more than anywhere else, antipathy toward China is striking. Just 5% of Japanese have a favorable opinion of China. At the same time, outright anti-China sentiment is limited. In 2013, in just 11 of the 38 nations surveyed is China actually viewed unfavorably by at least half of those surveyed. The strongest anti-China sentiment is in Japan, where 93% see the People's Republic in a negative light, including 48% of Japanese who have a very unfavorable view of China. There are also large majorities in Germany (64%), Italy (62%) and Israel (60%) who hold negative views of China. The rise in anti-China sentiment in Germany is particularly striking: from 33% disfavor in 2006 to 64% under the 2013 survey. And such unfavorable views exist despite Germany's success exporting to China.[7]

Despite China's general appeal to the young, half or more of those people surveyed in 26 of 38 nations think that China acts unilaterally in international affairs, notably increasing tensions between China and other neighboring countries, excluding Russia, over territorial disputes. This concern about Beijing's failure to consider other countries' interests when making foreign policy decisions is particularly strong in the Asia-Pacific – in Japan (89%), South Korea (79%) and Australia (79%) – and in Europe – in Spain (85%), Italy (83%), France (83%) and Britain (82%). About half or more of those in the seven Middle Eastern nations surveyed also think China acts unilaterally. This includes 79% of Israelis, 71% of Jordanians and 68% of Turks. There is relatively less concern about this issue in the U.S. (60%). African nations – in particular strong majorities in Kenya (77%), Nigeria (70%), South Africa (67%) and Senegal (62%) – believe Beijing does consider their interests when making foreign policy decisions.[7] Fifty-six per cent of Chinese think China should be more respected.[7]