Social status

  • social status is a measurement of a social value.[1][2] more specifically, it refers to the relative level of respect, honor, assumed competence, and deference accorded to people, groups, and organizations in a society. some writers have also referred to a socially valued role or category a person occupies as a "status" (e.g., gender, race, having a criminal conviction, etc.).[3] status is based in beliefs about who members of a society believe holds comparatively more or less social value.[4] by definition, these beliefs are broadly shared among members of a society. as such, people use status hierarchies to allocate resources, leadership positions, and other forms of power. in doing so, these shared cultural beliefs make unequal distributions of resources and power appear natural and fair, supporting systems of social stratification.[5] status hierarchies appear to be universal across human societies, affording valued benefits to those who occupy the higher rungs, such as better health, social approval, resources, influence, and freedom.[2]

    status hierarchies depend primarily on the possession and use of status symbols. these are cues people use to determine how much status a person holds and how they should be treated.[6] such symbols can include the possession of socially valuable attributes, like being conventionally beautiful or having a prestigious degree. other status symbols include wealth and its display through conspicuous consumption.[7] status in face-to-face interaction can also be conveyed through certain controllable behaviors, such as assertive speech, posture,[8] and emotional displays.[9]

  • determination
  • in different societies
  • in nonhuman animals
  • status inconsistency
  • inborn and acquired
  • social mobility
  • social stratification
  • max weber's three dimensions of stratification
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading

Social status is a measurement of a social value.[1][2] More specifically, it refers to the relative level of respect, honor, assumed competence, and deference accorded to people, groups, and organizations in a society. Some writers have also referred to a socially valued role or category a person occupies as a "status" (e.g., gender, race, having a criminal conviction, etc.).[3] Status is based in beliefs about who members of a society believe holds comparatively more or less social value.[4] By definition, these beliefs are broadly shared among members of a society. As such, people use status hierarchies to allocate resources, leadership positions, and other forms of power. In doing so, these shared cultural beliefs make unequal distributions of resources and power appear natural and fair, supporting systems of social stratification.[5] Status hierarchies appear to be universal across human societies, affording valued benefits to those who occupy the higher rungs, such as better health, social approval, resources, influence, and freedom.[2]

Status hierarchies depend primarily on the possession and use of status symbols. These are cues people use to determine how much status a person holds and how they should be treated.[6] Such symbols can include the possession of socially valuable attributes, like being conventionally beautiful or having a prestigious degree. Other status symbols include wealth and its display through conspicuous consumption.[7] Status in face-to-face interaction can also be conveyed through certain controllable behaviors, such as assertive speech, posture,[8] and emotional displays.[9]