Ten-Day War

  • ten-day war
    part of the yugoslav wars
    teritorialci so z armbrustom zadeli tank v križišču pred mmp rožna dolina..jpg
    yugoslav m-84 hit by slovenian anti-tank fire on the italian border post, rožna dolina.
    date27 june – 7 july 1991
    (1 week and 3 days)
    location
    slovenia
    result

    slovenian victory[1][2]

    • brioni accords
    • full-scale invasion by ypa averted
    • beginning of the yugoslav wars
    territorial
    changes
    independence of slovenia from yugoslavia
    belligerents
    yugoslavia slovenia slovenia
    commanders and leaders
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia ante marković[3]
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia veljko kadijević
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia blagoje adžić
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia stane brovet
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia zvonko jurjević
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia konrad kolšek
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia andrija rašeta
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia aleksandar vasiljević
    socialist federal republic of yugoslavia milan aksentijević
    slovenia milan kučan
    slovenia lojze peterle
    slovenia janez slapar
    slovenia janez janša
    slovenia igor bavčar
    units involved
    yugoslav people's army slovenian territorial defence
    slovenian police
    strength
    22,300 personnel[4] 35,200 slovenian territorial defence
    10,000 police[4]
    casualties and losses
    44 killed
    146 wounded
    4,693 prisoners[4]
    19 killed
    182 wounded[4]
    12 foreign civilians killed

    the ten-day war (slovene: desetdnevna vojna), or the slovenian war of independence (slovenska osamosvojitvena vojna),[5] was a brief conflict that followed slovenia's declaration of independence from yugoslavia on 25 june 1991.[6] it was fought between the slovenian territorial defence (slovene: teritorialna obramba republike slovenije) and the yugoslav people's army (jna). it lasted from 27 june 1991 until 7 july 1991, when the brioni accords were signed. it marked the beginning of the yugoslav wars.

  • background
  • conflict
  • casualties
  • holmec incident
  • strategic aspects
  • consequences of the war
  • see also
  • notes
  • sources

Ten-Day War
Part of the Yugoslav Wars
Teritorialci so z armbrustom zadeli tank v križišču pred MMP Rožna Dolina..jpg
Yugoslav M-84 hit by Slovenian anti-tank fire on the Italian border post, Rožna Dolina.
Date27 June – 7 July 1991
(1 week and 3 days)
Location
Result

Slovenian victory[1][2]

Territorial
changes
Independence of Slovenia from Yugoslavia
Belligerents
Yugoslavia Slovenia Slovenia
Commanders and leaders
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Ante Marković[3]
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Veljko Kadijević
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Blagoje Adžić
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Stane Brovet
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zvonko Jurjević
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Konrad Kolšek
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Andrija Rašeta
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Aleksandar Vasiljević
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Milan Aksentijević
Slovenia Milan Kučan
Slovenia Lojze Peterle
Slovenia Janez Slapar
Slovenia Janez Janša
Slovenia Igor Bavčar
Units involved
Yugoslav People's Army Slovenian Territorial Defence
Slovenian Police
Strength
22,300 personnel[4] 35,200 Slovenian Territorial Defence
10,000 police[4]
Casualties and losses
44 killed
146 wounded
4,693 prisoners[4]
19 killed
182 wounded[4]
12 foreign civilians killed

The Ten-Day War (Slovene: desetdnevna vojna), or the Slovenian War of Independence (slovenska osamosvojitvena vojna),[5] was a brief conflict that followed Slovenia's declaration of independence from Yugoslavia on 25 June 1991.[6] It was fought between the Slovenian Territorial Defence (Slovene: Teritorialna obramba Republike Slovenije) and the Yugoslav People's Army (JNA). It lasted from 27 June 1991 until 7 July 1991, when the Brioni Accords were signed. It marked the beginning of the Yugoslav Wars.