Thomism

  • thomas aquinas (c. 1225–1274)

    thomism is the philosophical school that arose as a legacy of the work and thought of thomas aquinas (1225–1274), philosopher, theologian, and doctor of the church. in philosophy, aquinas' disputed questions and commentaries on aristotle are perhaps his most well-known works.

    in theology, his summa theologica is one of the most influential documents in medieval theology and continues to be the central point of reference for the philosophy and theology of the catholic church. in the 1914 encyclical doctoris angelici[1] pope pius x cautioned that the teachings of the church cannot be understood without the basic philosophical underpinnings of aquinas' major theses:

    the capital theses in the philosophy of st. thomas are not to be placed in the category of opinions capable of being debated one way or another, but are to be considered as the foundations upon which the whole science of natural and divine things is based; if such principles are once removed or in any way impaired, it must necessarily follow that students of the sacred sciences will ultimately fail to perceive so much as the meaning of the words in which the dogmas of divine revelation are proposed by the magistracy of the church.[2]

    the second vatican council described aquinas' system as the "perennial philosophy".[3]

  • thomistic philosophy
  • metaphysics
  • anthropology
  • epistemology
  • impact
  • connection with jewish thought
  • scholarly perspectives
  • history
  • recent schools and interpretations
  • criticism
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274)

Thomism is the philosophical school that arose as a legacy of the work and thought of Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274), philosopher, theologian, and Doctor of the Church. In philosophy, Aquinas' disputed questions and commentaries on Aristotle are perhaps his most well-known works.

In theology, his Summa Theologica is one of the most influential documents in medieval theology and continues to be the central point of reference for the philosophy and theology of the Catholic Church. In the 1914 encyclical Doctoris Angelici[1] Pope Pius X cautioned that the teachings of the Church cannot be understood without the basic philosophical underpinnings of Aquinas' major theses:

The capital theses in the philosophy of St. Thomas are not to be placed in the category of opinions capable of being debated one way or another, but are to be considered as the foundations upon which the whole science of natural and divine things is based; if such principles are once removed or in any way impaired, it must necessarily follow that students of the sacred sciences will ultimately fail to perceive so much as the meaning of the words in which the dogmas of divine revelation are proposed by the magistracy of the Church.[2]

The Second Vatican Council described Aquinas' system as the "Perennial Philosophy".[3]