Treaty of Trianon

  • treaty of trianon
    signature de la paix avec la hongrie, en tête benárd Ágost hongrois(passant devant un piquet d'honneur à versailles).jpg
    arrival of the two signatories, Ágost benárd and alfréd drasche-lázár, on 4 june 1920 at the grand trianon palace in versailles
    signed4 june 1920
    locationversailles, france
    effective31 july 1921
    signatories1. principal allied and associated powers
    •  france
    •  united kingdom of great britain and ireland
    •  italy
    •  japan

    2. central powers
     hungary
    depositaryfrench government
    languagesfrench, english, italian
    treaty of trianon at wikisource
    events leading to world war ii
    1. treaty of versailles 1919
    2. treaty of trianon 1920
    3. treaty of rapallo 1920
    4. franco-polish alliance 1921
    5. march on rome 1922
    6. corfu incident 1923
    7. occupation of the ruhr 1923–1925
    8. mein kampf 1925
    9. pacification of libya 1923–1932
    10. dawes plan 1924
    11. locarno treaties 1925
    12. young plan 1929
    13. great depression 1929–1941
    14. japanese invasion of manchuria 1931
    15. pacification of manchukuo 1931–1942
    16. january 28 incident 1932
    17. world disarmament conference 1932–1934
    18. defense of the great wall 1933
    19. battle of rehe 1933
    20. nazis' rise to power in germany 1933
    21. tanggu truce 1933
    22. italo-soviet pact 1933
    23. inner mongolian campaign 1933–1936
    24. german–polish non-aggression pact 1934
    25. franco-soviet treaty of mutual assistance 1935
    26. soviet–czechoslovakia treaty of mutual assistance 1935
    27. he–umezu agreement 1935
    28. anglo-german naval agreement 1935
    29. december 9th movement
    30. second italo-ethiopian war 1935–1936
    31. remilitarization of the rhineland 1936
    32. spanish civil war 1936–1939
    33. anti-comintern pact 1936
    34. suiyuan campaign 1936
    35. xi'an incident 1936
    36. second sino-japanese war 1937–1945
    37. uss panay incident 1937
    38. anschluss mar. 1938
    39. may crisis may 1938
    40. battle of lake khasan july–aug. 1938
    41. undeclared german-czechoslovak war sep. 1938
    42. munich agreement sep. 1938
    43. first vienna award nov. 1938
    44. german occupation of czechoslovakia mar. 1939
    45. german ultimatum to lithuania mar. 1939
    46. slovak–hungarian war mar. 1939
    47. final offensive of the spanish civil war mar.–apr. 1939
    48. danzig crisis mar.–aug. 1939
    49. british guarantee to poland mar. 1939
    50. italian invasion of albania apr. 1939
    51. soviet–british–french moscow negotiations apr.–aug. 1939
    52. pact of steel may 1939
    53. battles of khalkhin gol may–sep. 1939
    54. molotov–ribbentrop pact aug. 1939
    55. invasion of poland sep. 1939

    the treaty of trianon (french: traité de trianon, hungarian: trianoni békeszerződés) was the peace agreement of 1920 that formally ended world war i between most of the allies of world war i[1] and the kingdom of hungary, the latter being one of the successor states to austria-hungary.[2][3][4][5] the treaty regulated the status of an independent hungarian state and defined its borders. it left hungary as a landlocked state that covered 93,073 square kilometres (35,936 sq mi), only 28% of the 325,411 square kilometres (125,642 sq mi) that had constituted the pre-war kingdom of hungary (the hungarian half of the austro-hungarian monarchy). its population was 7.6 million, only 36% of the pre-war kingdom's population of 20.9 million.[6] the areas that were allocated to neighbouring countries in total (and each of them separately) had a majority of non-hungarians but 31% of hungarians (3.3 million)[7] were left outside of post-trianon hungary.[8][9][10] five of the pre-war kingdom's ten largest cities were drawn into other countries. the treaty limited hungary's army to 35,000 officers and men, and the austro-hungarian navy ceased to exist.

    the principal beneficiaries of the territorial division of pre-war kingdom of hungary were the kingdom of romania, the czechoslovak republic, the kingdom of serbs, croats and slovenes (later yugoslavia), and the first austrian republic. one of the main elements of the treaty was the doctrine of "self-determination of peoples", and it was an attempt to give the non-hungarians their own national states.[11] in addition, hungary had to pay war reparations to its neighbours. the treaty was dictated by the allies rather than negotiated, and the hungarians had no option but to accept its terms.[11] the hungarian delegation signed the treaty under protest[8][12] on 4 june 1920 at the grand trianon palace in versailles, france. the treaty was registered in league of nations treaty series on 24 august 1921.[13]

    the modern boundaries of hungary are the same as those defined by the treaty of trianon, with some minor modifications until 1924 regarding the hungarian-austrian border and the notable exception of three villages that were transferred to czechoslovakia in 1947.[14][15]

  • borders of hungary
  • results and consequences
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Treaty of Trianon
Signature de la Paix avec la Hongrie, en tête Benárd Ágost hongrois(passant devant un piquet d'honneur à Versailles).jpg
Arrival of the two signatories, Ágost Benárd and Alfréd Drasche-Lázár, on 4 June 1920 at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles
Signed4 June 1920
LocationVersailles, France
Effective31 July 1921
Signatories1. Principal Allied and Associated Powers

2. Central Powers
 Hungary
DepositaryFrench Government
LanguagesFrench, English, Italian
Treaty of Trianon at Wikisource
Events leading to World War II
  1. Treaty of Versailles 1919
  2. Treaty of Trianon 1920
  3. Treaty of Rapallo 1920
  4. Franco-Polish alliance 1921
  5. March on Rome 1922
  6. Corfu incident 1923
  7. Occupation of the Ruhr 1923–1925
  8. Mein Kampf 1925
  9. Pacification of Libya 1923–1932
  10. Dawes Plan 1924
  11. Locarno Treaties 1925
  12. Young Plan 1929
  13. Great Depression 1929–1941
  14. Japanese invasion of Manchuria 1931
  15. Pacification of Manchukuo 1931–1942
  16. January 28 Incident 1932
  17. World Disarmament Conference 1932–1934
  18. Defense of the Great Wall 1933
  19. Battle of Rehe 1933
  20. Nazis' rise to power in Germany 1933
  21. Tanggu Truce 1933
  22. Italo-Soviet Pact 1933
  23. Inner Mongolian Campaign 1933–1936
  24. German–Polish Non-Aggression Pact 1934
  25. Franco-Soviet Treaty of Mutual Assistance 1935
  26. Soviet–Czechoslovakia Treaty of Mutual Assistance 1935
  27. He–Umezu Agreement 1935
  28. Anglo-German Naval Agreement 1935
  29. December 9th Movement
  30. Second Italo-Ethiopian War 1935–1936
  31. Remilitarization of the Rhineland 1936
  32. Spanish Civil War 1936–1939
  33. Anti-Comintern Pact 1936
  34. Suiyuan Campaign 1936
  35. Xi'an Incident 1936
  36. Second Sino-Japanese War 1937–1945
  37. USS Panay incident 1937
  38. Anschluss Mar. 1938
  39. May crisis May 1938
  40. Battle of Lake Khasan July–Aug. 1938
  41. Undeclared German-Czechoslovak War Sep. 1938
  42. Munich Agreement Sep. 1938
  43. First Vienna Award Nov. 1938
  44. German occupation of Czechoslovakia Mar. 1939
  45. German ultimatum to Lithuania Mar. 1939
  46. Slovak–Hungarian War Mar. 1939
  47. Final offensive of the Spanish Civil War Mar.–Apr. 1939
  48. Danzig Crisis Mar.–Aug. 1939
  49. British guarantee to Poland Mar. 1939
  50. Italian invasion of Albania Apr. 1939
  51. Soviet–British–French Moscow negotiations Apr.–Aug. 1939
  52. Pact of Steel May 1939
  53. Battles of Khalkhin Gol May–Sep. 1939
  54. Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact Aug. 1939
  55. Invasion of Poland Sep. 1939

The Treaty of Trianon (French: Traité de Trianon, Hungarian: Trianoni békeszerződés) was the peace agreement of 1920 that formally ended World War I between most of the Allies of World War I[1] and the Kingdom of Hungary, the latter being one of the successor states to Austria-Hungary.[2][3][4][5] The treaty regulated the status of an independent Hungarian state and defined its borders. It left Hungary as a landlocked state that covered 93,073 square kilometres (35,936 sq mi), only 28% of the 325,411 square kilometres (125,642 sq mi) that had constituted the pre-war Kingdom of Hungary (the Hungarian half of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy). Its population was 7.6 million, only 36% of the pre-war kingdom's population of 20.9 million.[6] The areas that were allocated to neighbouring countries in total (and each of them separately) had a majority of non-Hungarians but 31% of Hungarians (3.3 million)[7] were left outside of post-Trianon Hungary.[8][9][10] Five of the pre-war kingdom's ten largest cities were drawn into other countries. The treaty limited Hungary's army to 35,000 officers and men, and the Austro-Hungarian Navy ceased to exist.

The principal beneficiaries of the territorial division of pre-war Kingdom of Hungary were the Kingdom of Romania, the Czechoslovak Republic, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later Yugoslavia), and the First Austrian Republic. One of the main elements of the treaty was the doctrine of "self-determination of peoples", and it was an attempt to give the non-Hungarians their own national states.[11] In addition, Hungary had to pay war reparations to its neighbours. The treaty was dictated by the Allies rather than negotiated, and the Hungarians had no option but to accept its terms.[11] The Hungarian delegation signed the treaty under protest[8][12] on 4 June 1920 at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles, France. The treaty was registered in League of Nations Treaty Series on 24 August 1921.[13]

The modern boundaries of Hungary are the same as those defined by the Treaty of Trianon, with some minor modifications until 1924 regarding the Hungarian-Austrian border and the notable exception of three villages that were transferred to Czechoslovakia in 1947.[14][15]