Tunisian Revolution

  • tunisian revolution
    الثورة التونسية  (arabic)
    part of the arab spring
    caravane de la libération 4.jpg
    anti-government demonstrations during the tunisian revolution
    date18 december 2010 – 14 january 2011
    (3 weeks and 6 days)
    location
    tunisia
    caused by
    • government corruption
    • social inequalities
    • unemployment
    • political repression
    methods
    • civil resistance
    • demonstrations
    • general strikes
    • self-immolations
    • spontaneous uprisings
    resulted in
    • overthrow of the ben ali government
    • resignation of prime minister ghannouchi[1]
    • dissolution of the political police[2]
    • dissolution of the ruling party[3]
    • release of political prisoners[4]
    • elections of a constituent assembly[5]
    • subsequent protests against the interim islamist-led constituent assembly. government agrees to resign and engages in dialogue discussing the country's new transition.[6]
    • start of the arab spring
    casualties
    death(s)338[7]
    injuries2,147[7]
    part of a series on the
    tunisia
    coat of arms of tunisia.svg
    africa (orthographic projection).svg africa portalp history.svg history portal

    the tunisian revolution, also called the jasmine revolution, was an intensive 28-day campaign of civil resistance. it included a series of street demonstrations which took place in tunisia, and led to the ousting of longtime president zine el abidine ben ali in january 2011. it eventually led to a thorough democratisation of the country and to free and democratic elections.[8]

    the demonstrations were caused by high unemployment, food inflation, corruption,[9][10] a lack of political freedoms (such as freedom of speech)[11] and poor living conditions. the protests constituted the most dramatic wave of social and political unrest in tunisia in three decades[12][13] and resulted in scores of deaths and injuries, most of which were the result of action by police and security forces.

    the protests were sparked by the self-immolation of mohamed bouazizi on 17 december 2010.[14][15][16] they led to the ousting of ben ali on 14 january 2011, when he officially resigned after fleeing to saudi arabia, ending his 23 years in power.[17][18] labor unions were an integral part of the protests.[19] the tunisian national dialogue quartet was awarded the 2015 nobel peace prize for "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in tunisia in the wake of the tunisian revolution of 2011".[20] the protests inspired similar actions throughout the arab world, in a chain reaction which became known as the arab spring movement.

  • naming
  • background
  • mohamed bouazizi and sidi bouzid
  • protests
  • end of ben ali's rule
  • initial impact of ben ali's overthrow
  • ghannouchi government
  • caid essebsi government
  • effects
  • repercussion analysis
  • regional instability
  • aftermath
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Tunisian Revolution
الثورة التونسية  (Arabic)
Part of the Arab Spring
Caravane de la libération 4.jpg
Anti-government demonstrations during the Tunisian revolution
Date18 December 2010 – 14 January 2011
(3 weeks and 6 days)
Location
Caused by
Methods
Resulted in
Casualties
Death(s)338[7]
Injuries2,147[7]
Part of a series on the
Tunisia
Coat of arms of Tunisia.svg
Africa (orthographic projection).svg Africa portalP history.svg History portal

The Tunisian Revolution, also called the Jasmine Revolution, was an intensive 28-day campaign of civil resistance. It included a series of street demonstrations which took place in Tunisia, and led to the ousting of longtime president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011. It eventually led to a thorough democratisation of the country and to free and democratic elections.[8]

The demonstrations were caused by high unemployment, food inflation, corruption,[9][10] a lack of political freedoms (such as freedom of speech)[11] and poor living conditions. The protests constituted the most dramatic wave of social and political unrest in Tunisia in three decades[12][13] and resulted in scores of deaths and injuries, most of which were the result of action by police and security forces.

The protests were sparked by the self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi on 17 December 2010.[14][15][16] They led to the ousting of Ben Ali on 14 January 2011, when he officially resigned after fleeing to Saudi Arabia, ending his 23 years in power.[17][18] Labor unions were an integral part of the protests.[19] The Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet was awarded the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize for "its decisive contribution to the building of a pluralistic democracy in Tunisia in the wake of the Tunisian Revolution of 2011".[20] The protests inspired similar actions throughout the Arab world, in a chain reaction which became known as the Arab Spring movement.